Pitting in Hair Transplant Procedure

Greetings,

Today I will demonstrate a phenomenon known as “pitting”. This occurs when the transplanted grafts are placed too deeply and it causes the hairs to look like they are growing out of a hole or a pit. This is a completely unnatural look and can easily be avoided by placing the grafts properly with a small amount of tissue protruding above the skin. In the case of this patient, his previous procedure was performed at an unnamed large hair transplant chain operation and 2 different ┬ánurses were used to place each side of the hairline. In this case the left side had extensive pitting and the right side did not show the same amount (see the photos below). This is one more reason why quality control is so important in hair transplant procedures. We as physicians are only as good as the nurses placing the grafts and unqualified nurses placing the grafts can lead to results like you see here. My nursing staff have been with me over 10 years each and they have all been working in the field of hair transplant surgery for over 15 years each. Most of my nurses have worked on my scalp personally, and I trust them implicitly, as I am smart enough to know that my results are only as good as they are, and they are great.

All the best,

Marc Dauer, M.D.

This photo shows "pitting" from a previous hair transplant.

This photo shows “pitting” from a previous hair transplant.

This is from the same patient the other side of the frontal scalp that does not show significant pitting.

This is from the same patient the other side of the frontal scalp that does not show significant pitting.